Acute effects of different intra-repetition rest configurations on barbell peak velocity during the jump-shrug exercise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Resistance training with intra-repetition rest (IRR) may lead to the maintenance of peak velocity (PV), reduce fatigue, induce lower blood-lactate concentration, and enhance the technical performance of exercises compared to continuous repetitions. Several studies have investigated the effect of various IRR on various resistance exercises, but the acute effects of IRR on jump-shrug exercise PV remain unexplored. Purpose: This study examined whether different IRR configurations may contribute to maintaining velocity using fast velocity loads in the jump-shrug exercise. Methods: The study involved 12 resistance-training participants (age: 23.4±3.7 years, body mass: 70.3±12.7 kg, body height: 1.70±0.08 m) with 4.3±2.1 years of experience in resistance training. Participants performed the jump-shrug exercise on three different days using three different fast velocity loads of 15, 20, and 25% calculated from the maximum isometric mid-thigh pull dynamometer (IMTPd) test with a randomized order. For each training load, three sets were performed with three different IRR intervals of 2 (IRR2), 6 (IRR6), and 12 (IRR12) seconds with 10 minutes of rest between sets. Measurements included anthropometric characteristics, the maximum IMTPd score, and the PV evaluation across 12 repetitions during the three different load conditions. Results: Significant differences were found for 15, 20, and 25% load conditions for PV between IRR2 and IRR12 configurations (p<0.05). In addition, significant differences were found for the 20% load condition between IRR2 and IRR6 configurations (p<0.05). The percentage of PV loss was significantly lower for the IRR12 configuration than IRR2 across all training loads (p<0.05), while the percentage of PV loss was significantly lower for IRR6 compared to IRR2 for only the 20% load condition. Conclusions: These results suggest that an IRR configuration equal to or greater than 6 seconds during jump-shrugs may contribute to maintaining PV and the percentage of PV loss. Consequently, when fast velocity loads are used for jump-shrugs during power training, IRR equal to or greater than 6 seconds (ideally 12 seconds) should be applied to better maintain PV during repetitions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1103
Number of pages1110
JournalJournal of Physical Education and Sport
Volume23
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2023

Keywords

  • ballistic training, velocity loss, rest intervals, isometric mid-thigh pull

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