Charcot-marie-tooth disease in Cyprus: Epidemiological, clinical and genetic characteristics

Paschalis Nicolaou, Eleni Zamba-Papanicolaou, Pantelitsa Koutsou, Kleopas A. Kleopa, Anthi Georghiou, Georgios Hadjigeorgiou, Alexandros Papadimitriou, Theodoros Kyriakides, Kyproula Christodoulou

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited neuropathy. CMT is classified into 2 main subgroups: a demyelinating and an axonal type. Further subdivisions within these 2 main categories exist and intermediate forms have more recently been described. Inheritance can be autosomal dominant, recessive or X-linked. CMT is associated with more than 30 loci, and about 25 causative genes have been described thus far. Methods: We studied epidemiological, clinical and genetic characteristics of CMT in the Cypriot population. Results: The prevalence of CMT in Cyprus on January 15, 2009, is estimated to be 16 per 100,000. Thirty-three families and 8 sporadic patients were ascertained. CMT was demyelinating in 52%, axonal in 33% and intermediate in 15% of the patients. Thirteen families had PMP22 duplication, 3 families had the PMP22 S22F mutation, 4 families had GJB1/Cx32 mutations, 2 families had different MPZ mutations, 1 of them novel, and 2 families had different MFN2 mutations. Nine families and 8 sporadic patients were excluded from the common CMT genes. Conclusion: The most frequent CMT mutation worldwide, the PMP22 duplication, is also the most frequent CMT mutation in the Cypriot population. Five out of the 8 other mutations are novel, not reported in other populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-177
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroepidemiology
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

Keywords

  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
  • Genetic characteristics
  • Neuropathy

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    Nicolaou, P., Zamba-Papanicolaou, E., Koutsou, P., Kleopa, K. A., Georghiou, A., Hadjigeorgiou, G., Papadimitriou, A., Kyriakides, T., & Christodoulou, K. (2010). Charcot-marie-tooth disease in Cyprus: Epidemiological, clinical and genetic characteristics. Neuroepidemiology, 35(3), 171-177. https://doi.org/10.1159/000314351