Dietary glycaemic index and cognitive function

Prospective associations in adults of the 1946 British birth cohort

Elena Philippou, Gerda K. Pot, Alexandros Heraclides, Marcus Richards, Rebecca Bendayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Evidence suggests that the rate of glucose release following consumption of carbohydrate-containing foods, defined as the glycaemic index (GI), is inversely associated with cognitive function. To date, most of the evidence stems from either single-meal studies or highly heterogeneous cohort studies. We aimed to study the prospective associations of diet GI at age 53 years with outcomes of verbal memory and letter search tests at age 69 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years. Design: Longitudinal population-based birth cohort study. Setting: MRC National Survey for Health and Development. Participants: Cohort members (n 1252). Results: Using multivariable linear and logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders, associations of higher-GI diet with lower verbal memory, lower letter search speed and lower number of hits in a letter search test were attenuated after adjustments for cognitive ability at age 15 years, educational attainment, further training and occupational social class. No association was observed between diet GI at 53 years and letter search accuracy or speed-accuracy trade-off at 69 years, or between diet GI at 53 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years in any cognitive measure. Conclusions: Diet GI does not appear to predict cognitive function or decline, which was mainly explained by childhood cognitive ability, education and occupational social class. Our findings confirm the need for further research on the association between diet and cognition from a life-course perspective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1415-1424
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Glycemic Index
Cognition
Parturition
Diet
Aptitude
Social Class
Cohort Studies
Health Surveys
Meals
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Carbohydrates
Prospective Studies
Education
Glucose
Food
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Carbohydrates
  • Glucose release
  • National Survey of Health and Development
  • Prospective study

Cite this

@article{ccb4b1a6f9b84d35a4b319548a596d97,
title = "Dietary glycaemic index and cognitive function: Prospective associations in adults of the 1946 British birth cohort",
abstract = "Objective: Evidence suggests that the rate of glucose release following consumption of carbohydrate-containing foods, defined as the glycaemic index (GI), is inversely associated with cognitive function. To date, most of the evidence stems from either single-meal studies or highly heterogeneous cohort studies. We aimed to study the prospective associations of diet GI at age 53 years with outcomes of verbal memory and letter search tests at age 69 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years. Design: Longitudinal population-based birth cohort study. Setting: MRC National Survey for Health and Development. Participants: Cohort members (n 1252). Results: Using multivariable linear and logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders, associations of higher-GI diet with lower verbal memory, lower letter search speed and lower number of hits in a letter search test were attenuated after adjustments for cognitive ability at age 15 years, educational attainment, further training and occupational social class. No association was observed between diet GI at 53 years and letter search accuracy or speed-accuracy trade-off at 69 years, or between diet GI at 53 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years in any cognitive measure. Conclusions: Diet GI does not appear to predict cognitive function or decline, which was mainly explained by childhood cognitive ability, education and occupational social class. Our findings confirm the need for further research on the association between diet and cognition from a life-course perspective.",
keywords = "Aged, Carbohydrates, Glucose release, National Survey of Health and Development, Prospective study",
author = "Elena Philippou and Pot, {Gerda K.} and Alexandros Heraclides and Marcus Richards and Rebecca Bendayan",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S136898001800352X",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1415--1424",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "8",

}

Dietary glycaemic index and cognitive function : Prospective associations in adults of the 1946 British birth cohort. / Philippou, Elena; Pot, Gerda K.; Heraclides, Alexandros; Richards, Marcus; Bendayan, Rebecca.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 22, No. 8, 01.06.2019, p. 1415-1424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary glycaemic index and cognitive function

T2 - Prospective associations in adults of the 1946 British birth cohort

AU - Philippou, Elena

AU - Pot, Gerda K.

AU - Heraclides, Alexandros

AU - Richards, Marcus

AU - Bendayan, Rebecca

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Objective: Evidence suggests that the rate of glucose release following consumption of carbohydrate-containing foods, defined as the glycaemic index (GI), is inversely associated with cognitive function. To date, most of the evidence stems from either single-meal studies or highly heterogeneous cohort studies. We aimed to study the prospective associations of diet GI at age 53 years with outcomes of verbal memory and letter search tests at age 69 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years. Design: Longitudinal population-based birth cohort study. Setting: MRC National Survey for Health and Development. Participants: Cohort members (n 1252). Results: Using multivariable linear and logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders, associations of higher-GI diet with lower verbal memory, lower letter search speed and lower number of hits in a letter search test were attenuated after adjustments for cognitive ability at age 15 years, educational attainment, further training and occupational social class. No association was observed between diet GI at 53 years and letter search accuracy or speed-accuracy trade-off at 69 years, or between diet GI at 53 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years in any cognitive measure. Conclusions: Diet GI does not appear to predict cognitive function or decline, which was mainly explained by childhood cognitive ability, education and occupational social class. Our findings confirm the need for further research on the association between diet and cognition from a life-course perspective.

AB - Objective: Evidence suggests that the rate of glucose release following consumption of carbohydrate-containing foods, defined as the glycaemic index (GI), is inversely associated with cognitive function. To date, most of the evidence stems from either single-meal studies or highly heterogeneous cohort studies. We aimed to study the prospective associations of diet GI at age 53 years with outcomes of verbal memory and letter search tests at age 69 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years. Design: Longitudinal population-based birth cohort study. Setting: MRC National Survey for Health and Development. Participants: Cohort members (n 1252). Results: Using multivariable linear and logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders, associations of higher-GI diet with lower verbal memory, lower letter search speed and lower number of hits in a letter search test were attenuated after adjustments for cognitive ability at age 15 years, educational attainment, further training and occupational social class. No association was observed between diet GI at 53 years and letter search accuracy or speed-accuracy trade-off at 69 years, or between diet GI at 53 years and rate of decline between 53 and 69 years in any cognitive measure. Conclusions: Diet GI does not appear to predict cognitive function or decline, which was mainly explained by childhood cognitive ability, education and occupational social class. Our findings confirm the need for further research on the association between diet and cognition from a life-course perspective.

KW - Aged

KW - Carbohydrates

KW - Glucose release

KW - National Survey of Health and Development

KW - Prospective study

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065085749&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S136898001800352X

DO - 10.1017/S136898001800352X

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 1415

EP - 1424

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 8

ER -