Effects of dehydration on archery performance, subjective feelings and heart rate during a competition simulation

Alexandros Savvides, Christoforos D. Giannaki, Angelos Vlahoyiannis, Pinelopi S. Stavrinou, George Aphamis

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the effect of dehydration on archery performance, subjective feelings and heart rate response. Ten national level archers performed two archery competition simulations, once under euhydration (EUH) and once in a dehydrated state (DEH), induced by 24-h reduced fluid intake. Hydration status was verified prior to each trial by urine specific gravity (USG ≥ 1.025). Archery score was measured according to official archery regulations. Subjective feelings of thirst, fatigue and concentration were recorded on a visual analogue scale. Heart rate was continuously monitored during the trials. Archery performance was similar between trials (p = 0.155). During DEH trial (USG 1.032 ± 0.005), the athletes felt thirstier (p < 0.001), more fatigued (p = 0.041) and less able to concentrate (p = 0.016) compared with the EUH trial (USG 1.015 ± 0.004). Heart rate during DEH at baseline (85 ± 5 b min-1) was higher (p = 0.021) compared with EUH (78 ± 6 b min-1) and remained significantly higher during the latter stages of the DEH compared to EUH trial. In conclusion, archery performance over 72 arrows was not affected by dehydration, despite the induced psychological and physiological strain, revealed from decreased feeling of concentration, increased sensation of fatigue and increased heart rate during the DEH trial.

Original languageEnglish
Article number67
JournalJournal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Alertness
  • Athletes
  • Fatigue
  • Heart rate
  • Hydration
  • Urine specific gravity

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