Examining educational technology and achievement through latent variable modeling

Elena C. Papanastasiou, Efi Paparistodemou

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of computers in the teaching and learning of mathematics appears to be increasing exponentially year by year. Consequently, the amount of research on the relationship between computer use and achievement has been exponentially increasing as well. This trend is reflected by the change in how the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) has approached the computer-achievement relationship. In 1984 when the Second International Science Study was conducted, a single question was included regarding the availability of computers in schools.1 By 1995 the student background questionnaire from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) included four very broad computer-related questions. Two of the questions asked about the frequency with which the students used computers in their mathematics and science classes. The other two questions asked whether students liked using computers for mathematics and for science. In 1999 the student background questionnaire of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study-Repeat (TIMSS-R) included three times as many computer-related questions, which were much more specific compared to the TIMSS-1995 questionnaire. In the 2003 TIMSS, the number of computer-related questions did not increase, but they became even more specific, focusing on the locations in which computers are used by students, as well as on the types of activities that are being performed on the computer, with an emphasis on the use of the Internet.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLessons Learned
Subtitle of host publicationWhat International Assessments Tell Us About Math Achievement
PublisherBrookings Institution Press
Pages205-225
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)0815753349, 9780815753346
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Examining educational technology and achievement through latent variable modeling'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Papanastasiou, E. C., & Paparistodemou, E. (2007). Examining educational technology and achievement through latent variable modeling. In Lessons Learned: What International Assessments Tell Us About Math Achievement (pp. 205-225). Brookings Institution Press.