Relationships between gross- and fine motor functions, cognitive abilities, and self-regulatory aspects of students with physical disabilities

Panagiotis Varsamis, Ioannis Agaliotis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports research on self-regulatory aspects (i.e., goal-setting, self-efficacy and self-evaluation) of secondary and post-secondary students with congenital motor disabilities, who performed a ball-throwing-at-a-target task. Participants were divided into four subgroups presenting distinct combinations of motor and cognitive abilities (i.e., normal cognitive development and mild physical disabilities, normal cognitive development and severe physical disabilities, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability and mild physical disabilities, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability and severe physical disabilities). Results showed that students presenting mild motor disabilities exhibited a positive self-concept and self-regulation profile, irrespective of their cognitive functioning. Students with considerable motor disabilities, but without cognitive challenges, presented a negative, though realistic self-concept and self-regulation profile. Finally, students with considerable motor disabilities and mild-to-moderate cognitive disabilities showed a positive, though unrealistic, self-regulation profile. The nature of the diverse relationship of motor and cognitive (dis)abilities to specific self-regulatory aspects are discussed, and important instructional implications are mentioned.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)430-440
Number of pages11
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Congenital physical disabilities
  • Motivation
  • Motor disability severity
  • Self-regulation

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