Sociodemographic and psychological predictors of changes in dietary fat consumption in adults with high blood cholesterol following counseling in primary care

Andrew Steptoe, Sheelagh Doherty, Sally Kerry, Elizabeth Rink, Sean Hilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The associations between sociodemographic variables, psychological factors, and changes in dietary fat consumption over 4 months were assessed in a randomized controlled trial of behavioral counseling versus standard advice. Patients were 141 men and 150 women, with an average age of 52.1 years and total cholesterol level of 7.27 mmol/l (278 mg/dl). Smokers, younger patients, and those with greater body mass index had higher fat intake at baseline. Behavioral counseling led to greater reductions in fat intake than did standard advice. Self-efficacy and ratings of benefits of low-fat diets were related to fat consumption at baseline, and changes in these measures were correlated with changes in fat intake. Family support, baseline anticipated regret, and (for the behavioral counseling group only) baseline behavioral intentions predicted reductions in fat intake. The results indicated that psychosocial variables associated cross-sectionally with fat consumption do not necessarily predict change and that factors involved in the process of change and the prediction of change need to be differentiated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)411-419
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Behavior change
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Diet
  • Fat intake
  • Prevention

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