The effect of evening cycling at different intensities on sleep in healthy young adults with intermediate chronobiological phenotype: A randomized, cross-over trial

Angelos Vlahoyiannis, George Aphamis, Daniel Ala Eddin, Christoforos D. Giannaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of various cycling intensities on sleep-related parameters in healthy young adults with intermediate chronobiological phenotype. Ten recreationally trained male volunteers underwent an evening i) moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT; 45 min at 70% Wmax), ii) high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 10 × 1 min at 90% Wmax), iii) sprint interval training (SIT; 6 × 20 sec at 140% Wmax) or iv) a non-exercise (CON) trial in randomized, counter-balanced and crossover order. At baseline, somatometric data, maximum oxygen uptake and chronotype were evaluated. Sleep-related indices and daily activity were recorded by a multi-sensor activity monitor. Total sleep time was longer after SIT compared to CON and MICT (p < 0.05). Sleep efficiency was higher in SIT than in CON (p < 0.05). Sleep onset latency did not differ among trials. Wake after sleep onset was decreased after SIT compared to CON (p= 0.049). No differences were found for bedtime among trials. Wake time was earlier in the MICT trial compared to CON (p = 0.026). Evening cycling exercise -independently of intensity- did not impair sleep of individuals with intermediate chronobiological phenotype. Furthermore, a single SIT session improved sleep quantity and continuation of individuals with this specific chronotype.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • high-intensity interval training
  • moderate intensity continuous training
  • sleep efficiency
  • Sleep time
  • sprint interval training

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