The Price of Singlehood: Assessing the Impact of Involuntary Singlehood on Emotions and Life Satisfaction

Menelaos Apostolou, Ioanna Matogian, Georgia Koskeridou, Marios Shialos, Polixeni Georgiadou

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A considerable proportion of people living in Western societies are single, i.e., they do not have an intimate partner. Recent research has indicated that about half of these instances are involuntary—people want to be in a relationship, but face difficulties in attracting partners. Within the context of an evolutionary theoretical framework, the current study aims to estimate the occurrence of involuntary singlehood in the Greek cultural context and to assess its impact on emotional wellbeing and on life satisfaction. Using an online sample of 735 Greek-speaking participants (431 women and 304 men), it was found that nearly 40% of those who were single were involuntarily so. It was also found that involuntary singles experienced significantly more negative emotions and lower life satisfaction than voluntary singles and people in a relationship.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)416-425
    Number of pages10
    JournalEvolutionary Psychological Science
    Volume5
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

    Keywords

    • Emotions
    • Involuntary singlehood
    • Life satisfaction
    • Mating
    • Singlehood

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