Using Granger causality to characterise bidirectional interactions in the human brain during induction of anaesthesia

Nicoletta Nicolaou, Julius Georgiou, Saverios Houris, Pandelitsa Alexandrou

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

General anaesthesia is a reversible state whereby conscious experience is disrupted and reflexes to afferent stimuli are depressed. The precise method of action of anaesthetic agents is still largely unknown. However, the administration of anaesthetics causes observable changes in the electrical brain activity (EEG), the study of which can provide an insight into the mechanism of action of general anaesthesia. This paper investigates the patterns of bidirectional interactions that are manifest in brain activity during anaesthetic induction with propofol. Granger Causality is applied to the EEG of patients scheduled for surgery under general anaesthesia as a means of characterising the interactions between different brain areas prior and after the administration of the anaesthetic agents. Strong unidirectional information flow between frontal and posterior areas was found to occur shortly after anaesthetic induction.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBIOSIGNALS 2011 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing
Pages188-194
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing, BIOSIGNALS 2011 - Rome, Italy
Duration: 26 Jan 201129 Jan 2011

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing, BIOSIGNALS 2011
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period26/01/1129/01/11

Keywords

  • Anaesthesia monitoring
  • Bidirectional interaction
  • Electroencephalogram
  • Granger causality
  • Synchronisation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Using Granger causality to characterise bidirectional interactions in the human brain during induction of anaesthesia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Nicolaou, N., Georgiou, J., Houris, S., & Alexandrou, P. (2011). Using Granger causality to characterise bidirectional interactions in the human brain during induction of anaesthesia. In BIOSIGNALS 2011 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-Inspired Systems and Signal Processing (pp. 188-194)